Book Reviews: 2010

 

November 2010 (Vol 27, Issue 10) – This issue of the Journal of Product Innovation Management (JPIM) includes a book review of “Burning the Ships:  Intellectual Property and the Transformation of Microscoft” by Marshall Phelps and David Kline.

This is a book as much about teams and organizations managing conflict brought on by significant change as it is about Intellectual Property (IP).  Intertwined throughout a series of engaging and personal stories – showing how Microsoft instituted a strategic personality makeover from a monopolistic bully to a respected collaborative partner – are lessons that every business person can utilize in building and implementing diverse teams to meet clear strategic objectives.  Collaboration (pg. 46) “enables a company to more broadly and rapidly disseminate its technologies and products into the market through the cooperative efforts of others.  It provides the framework for pursuing joint product development work with other companies that can lead to greater success in the marketplace.

You can read the full review of Burning the Ships here.  If you are a PDMA member, you can access the full content of this issue at www.pdma.org.

September 2010 (Vol 27, Issue 5) – This issue of the Journal of Product Innovation Management (JPIM) includes a book review of “Innovation Nation:  How America Is Losing Its Innovation Edge, Why It Matters, and What We Can Do To Get It Back” by John Kao.

Though originally written to inform the 2008 U.S. Presidential primary agenda, Innovation Nation yet offers an insightful roadmap for anyone with global operations to develop innovative solutions for so-called “wicked problems”.  Dr. Kao draws on his wide-ranging experiences, covering the spectrum from Harvard Business School to Hollywood to the U.S. Navy Postgraduate School, yielding policy direction for corporations, governments, and academics in the United States and other nations to face ever-more competitive challenges in the global economies of the 21st century.

The book can be roughly divided into three sections:  first, the history of large innovation projects in the U.S. (Manhattan Project, NASA); next, the importance of strong leaders driving heavyweight teams; and finally, a prolific vision of innovation for the future world.

 You can read the full review of Innovation Nation here.  If you are a PDMA member, you can access the full content of this issue at www.pdma.org.

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